Mobile Free Range Learning (February 10 Tools Challenge, Part II)

One of the things I’m dealing with when it comes to blogging is the concept of writing things that people want to read. It seems simple enough, but it’s really more difficult than one would think. When the page views and the comments don’t roll in, it can really affect one’s confidence. I continue to remind myself, however, that this blog is still relatively new and that I have a lot to learn. So in the spirit of complete transparency, just know that if you’re blogging for your coalition and you’re not seeing the results you’d like, you’re not alone. But let’s keep pushing through the uncertain times and see what can happen.

Now, back to our regularly scheduled program…

Last week, I blogged about learning more about using the iPad as part of the 10 Tools Challenge. In Part I, I mostly focused on apps while promising to talk about training and learning in Parts II and III. In the spirit of writing things that people want to read, I’m going to skip the training part, as I think I’ll have more insight into that later on. Instead, I’d like to focus on the mobile Free Range Learning opportunities that the iPad enabled me to experience.

The first online course I’ve taken this year (accessing via the iPad) is the iPhone Video Hero course offered by Jules Watkins. I know just enough about traditional video and audio production to be dangerous, but I wasn’t familiar with iPhone/iPad production at all. When I found out that the youth attending my “Using Social Media for Good” training would have access to iPads, I knew I’d have to take what I knew about traditional media and modify it to mobile devices–and fast! Jules’ lessons not only taught me about the specifics of creating amazing audio and video footage using an iPhone/iPad, but it also provided tips about video and audio production in general that I didn’t know prior to taking the course. Priced at only $97, this course is affordable and would definitely benefit any youth or adult coalition. You may not be able to afford a membership for every coalition member, but I can’t stress the value it would bring to those who are interested in creating these kinds of products for your group. If you do decide to sign up, I would be grateful if you use the referral link in this paragraph and on my Recommended Products page.

Much of my Free Range Learning this year has come from a site that most people would consider less about learning and more about time-wasting, and that site would be Pinterest (by way of the iPad app). Yes, it’s easy to jump on Pinterest and get lost in the vegan cupcake recipes, DIY map projects, and sarcastic som(ee)cards, but it can also be used for learning and research. By doing a simple search, you can find pins related to almost any topic–my favorites being Social Media, Productivity/Apps/Resources, and Infographics. On Friday, we even created a specific Prevention Infographics board for those who wish to share and find infographics specifically related to substance abuse prevention topics.  (Contact me if you would like to be added as a contributor to the board.) The great thing about Pinterest, as with most other social media sites, is that you create the content that you want to see. Therefore, if you think Pinterest is all about cookie recipes and homeschooling ideas, it’s because you have chosen to follow people who pin that content. However, with a little bit of research, you can find contacts and boards that focus on your specific interests. Of course, be warned that many of us (ME!) are guilty of mixing personal and professional boards, so be sure to “Follow All” and then unfollow boards that don’t interest you. After all, not everyone wants his or her timeline filled with Doctor Who memes.

tights

“You are the superhero you’ve been waiting for.” ~Chris Brogan

The latest focus of my Free Range Learning project is working through the book It’s Not About the Tights: An Owners Manual for Bravery by Chris Brogan. This book is only available in Kindle format, but for $5, you can’t beat the price. I’ve been reading this on the Kindle app on my iPad. While I know there are those of you who shun e-books for various reasons, this is one of those books that is enhanced by the e-book format. First of all, I have enabled the “Popular Highlights” setting, which allows me to discover what other readers have highlighted in this book. Not only does it give me the opportunity to see what like-minded people find important, but it also directs my attention specifically to meaningful parts of the book. If that isn’t social learning, I don’t know what is! Also, although this book is in electronic format, the reader is encouraged to keep a pen-to-paper “Brave Journal” to track his or her own progress. This combination of the technological side and the traditional side of learning has created a very influential learning experience that I hope to utilize in my own work.

In the process of checking the first box in the 10 Tools Challenge, not only was I able to learn more about the tool, but I also found myself learning through the tool. The iPad, or any tablet for that matter, is a powerful resource that is underutilized and, in my opinion, misunderstood in today’s coalition work. We should proudly and confidently use our tablets to change the perception of it from a toy to a legitimate must-have for increased productivity and for tech-savvy coalition work.

I would love to hear more about how you use the iPad in your day-to-day work, for learning, for networking, or for other tasks. You can email me, leave a comment below, or take it to Twitter. As always, thank you for contributing to the conversation, and let’s go forth and do good things!

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About preventiongeek

Native Oklahoman carpetbagging in gorgeous Washington state. Passionate about using social media for good, e-learning, writing, positivity & robots. #FindTheYES

Posted on March 25, 2013, in Free Range Learning, Technology and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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